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25 Ways to Use Lavender

Lavender is a crop gaining in popularity in BC. The variety of species and uses in a myriad of products are encouraging to growers looking to find markets for the fragrant herb. READ MORE in this article by Ronda Payne, “Stop and Smell the Lavender”.

25 WAYS TO USE LAVENDER

  1. Make a calming tea made with dried lavender flower heads, chamomile, oat straw and other calming herbs.
  2. Make a lavender sachet by adding organic lavender buds to a muslin bag – gift it as a wedding favor.
  3. Make homemade lavender scented candles, by adding fresh or dried lavender buds and a few drops of lavender essential oil into the heated wax.
  4. For a lovely salad dressing, whisk together 6 Tbsp olive oil, 2 Tbsp balsamic or apple cider vinegar, 1 Tbsp lemon juice, 1 crushed garlic clove, 2 Tbsp honey, 1 tsp each mustard powder and organic dried lavender flowers.
  5. Crush fresh flowers and spread it on your legs and arms to help repel flies and mosquitoes while sitting outside in the summer.
  6. Use pressed lavender blooms to decorate homemade cards and gift wrapping.
  7. Tie a handful of fresh lavender flowers together with decorative string or ribbon, and hang it on a door for a cozy and fragrant décor.
  8. You can bake with organically grown lavender by adding it into scone, cake or cookie recipes – do a search online to find a recipe that appeals to you.
  9. Dab lavender infused oil onto itchy and dry skin – is especially good for children (see #25 for Lavender oil recipe).
  10. shutterstock_274096505A few drops of lavender essential oil on the skin can help soothe bug bites.
  11. For lavender infused vinegar, add a handful of organic lavender buds (dried or fresh) to 2 cups white wine or apple cider vinegar. Let sit for up to 6 weeks, shaking every few days. Strain before use.
  12. Place a lavender pillow in your linen closet and dresser drawers, to add a sweet scent to clothes and linens.
  13. Make Lavender Sugar –  Use in baking or to sprinkle on sweets or ice cream.  Good to have around to  sweeten Iced Tea and Lemonade: 1 Tbsp dried Lavender, 2 cups granulated sugar. Grind or crush Lavender and mix in the sugar.  Store in a tightly covered jar.  Let sit about 3 days before using.
  14. For Lavender Simple Syrup: In a small pan, boil 1 cup of water and 1 cup sugar until the sugar dissolves.  Remove from heat and stir in 2 Tbsp fresh or dried lavender, 1 small strip of lemon zest and let steep for 20 minutes.  Strain into a container with a tight-fitting lid and store in the refrigerator until needed.
  15. Tie together a large bunch of dried lavender blooms with a few forget-me-nots, lily of the valley and small daisies for a lovely and elegant lavender bouquet.
  16. Use organic lavender flower blooms to decorate a cake.
  17. Add crushed dried lavender flowers to your homemade liquid soap recipe.
  18. Add organic lavender blooms to your homemade blackberry jam for a nice and fragrant variation.
  19. Make a Dream Pillow by stuffing dried flower heads into a sachet and place under the pillowcase at bedtime.
  20. Homemade lavender potpourri makes for a great gift for yourself or a loved one.
  21. Stir crumbled organic fresh lavender blooms and a pinch of cinnamon into vanilla ice cream for a pleasant treat.
  22. Use your scrap sewing material to make a lavender eye pillow.
  23. Place fresh flowers in closets and any other storage space to deter moths and silverfish.
  24. Take a picture of your lavender bouquet on an old wooden table or other romantic backdrop, print it out, frame it and hang it in your house.
  25. Lavender oil: With a wooden mallet, bruise freshly cut organic lavender flowers, stems and leaves and stuff them into a 500 mL mason jar, cover with oil (light olive, almond or jojoba) and let sit for 48 hours. Strain (repeat the above steps again for a stronger fragrance) and store oil in a dark glass jar.

Source: http://naturopathicbynature.com/50-ways-to-use-lavender and http://www.pleasantvalleylavender.com/Recipes.html

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